The Infects (Sean Beaudoin)

Posted: October 15, 2015 in fiction
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

This is a piece of teenage escapism. Perfect for that role, actually: fast-moving plot, ineffectual or evil adults, and awkward teen heroes.

Scary.

Especially after Petal, wearing a black skirt and matching lipstick, cornered him at school.

She never wore red skirts. She never wore lipstick.

Nick’s head went blank again, smooth, empty. A flat white glacier of nothingness. Not even a woolly mammoth buried in the permafrost.

“Hi,” she said quietly.

It was a brilliant tactic. Short. Friendly but noncommittal. Giving up no information while still requiring a response.

“Hi,” he answered.

Less brilliant. Somewhat uncreative. Verging on plagiarism.

Oh, and it’s a zombie thriller, too. Like any good zombie apocalypse story, the idea is that a lot of us are pretty much walking dead already, and that a catastrophe would do us all a lot of good. Nick works at a chicken processing plant, and after weeks of overwork he slips and stabs his own hand pretty badly, spewing blood all over the chickens. Instead of using the kill switch to halt production, he pushes over the conveyor belt and ruins who-knows-how-much product. But then, after people start turning into zombies after eating at a fast-food fried chicken joint, he begins to suspect that the company decided not to take a loss after all. Why does his blood turn people into zombies? Well, his dad used to work in the research department at the factory, and he brought home some of his experiments and fed them to his kids. I’ve never liked fast-food fried chicken, but since my primary survival skill is the ability to skip meals without complaining, I’d be zombie food for sure.

It makes me think about the weird situation American teenagers are in. As adults, we romanticize our own pasts and then try to extend our children’s childhoods for as long as possible, because we all hate being grown-ups. But people used to be grown up by the time they were thirteen, working full-time factory jobs and churning out babies for abusive husbands. Teenagers haven’t lost the desire for financial independence and sexual activity, but our culture has convinced us that those things are in some ways unsafe for people younger than eighteen or twenty-one. Remember when you couldn’t send your ne’er-do-well son to sea at the age of sixteen because he was already too old? We establish habits during our teen years that will last our entire lives, yet we don’t really encourage teens to develop healthy lifestyles. “They’re just kids; let them enjoy themselves.” What a load of rubbish. They’re bored; give them satisfying work to do. Or at least something to do other than play violent video games and share STDs. They know how to be good people, so let’s get out of their way and let them be who they are.

“Know what I like about you, Nero?”

“No clue.”

Me neither.

“I could tell right away, even when we were alone, you weren’t going to ask lesbian questions.”

“What questions?”

“You know – how does this feel? How does that feel? Is it just a stage I’m going through? The kinds of things boys always ask to make themselves seem open-minded but are actually just pervy and rude.”

“Oh.”

“It’s cool that you have no idea how cool you are.”

Don’t get me wrong, kids are often brutal, but as long as we keep teenagers isolated (still in the wrapper, like mint-condition action figures) they won’t have any reason not to be.

I regret a lot of things from my teenage years. I regret not figuring out that the reason I wasn’t attracted to the girls at my school was that I’m gay. I regret putting all of my effort into my mind while completely ignoring my body – I’d like to be more fit, but it’s hard to start a habit of exercising after thirty-five years without it. Also, because I didn’t exercise then, I’m at a higher risk for cancer and heart disease now. I regret playing video games in my spare time (almost constantly, from sixteen to nineteen). I regret trying to fit in where I was instead of looking for a more congenial social group. I regret accepting boredom, dissatisfaction, and unhappiness as normal. I regret waiting for my life to start. Sometimes it seems that I’m still waiting. Convincing myself that I was content when I was actually depressed was a bad habit to start, and it’s been one of the toughest to kick.

This is my life. It’s happening now. I’m going to go out and live it.

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